Are you drinking enough water?

H2OWe all know that water is essential to life. It helps regulate our body temperature, lubricates our joints and carriers nutrients between our major organs and flushes out the waste. In biology we learned that the body is comprised of approximately 65% water.  Did you know your brain is 73% water?<

Hydration is crucial for optimal brain (and body) function.

Studies have shown that a 1 to 2% reduction in body weight over the day can be a sign of mild dehydration that is significant enough to reduce mental performance (e.g., concentration, alertness, short-term memory) and overall productivity.

That’s why in addition to getting regular exercise, to perform your best at work you need to be sure you are adequately hydrated.

How much fluid should you be drinking each day?

Most scientific experts recommend on average, an intake of fluid and food equal to:

  • Men:  85 ounces or 2.5 liters
  • Women:  64 ounces or 2 liters

That seems a bit low – particularly if you work-out. An easy calculation is to plan to drink at least half your body weight in fluid ounces.  So if you weigh 160 pounds, you should take-in at least 80 ounces (2.365 liters) of fluid per day.

You can also use this  HYDRATION CALCULATOR from About.com that factors in time spent exercising and get a closer estimate.

TIP #1: Drink plenty of water.  But you can mix-it-up a little with other beverages like, herbal teas, coffee, low-sodium broth, flavored water (with squeezed lemon – it’s great for weight loss), 100% fruit juice and milk.

TIP #2: Start your day off right. Drink 20 ounces of cold water when you first wake up to get your metabolism revved-up and detoxify.

So, stay on top of your game at work by slipping in a few short workouts with the OfficeGym throughout the day and remember to hydrate!

“Make physical activity part of your everyday”

To your health,
Your friends at OfficeGym

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Source
1 Popkin BM et al. (2010). Water, hydration and health. Nutr Rev 68(8): 439-58.
About.com. Hydration Calculator: http://nutrition.about.com/library/blwatercalculator.htm

Dave, Adam. (2013). The Benefits of Drinking Water Just After Waking Up.http://www.livestrong.com/article/446197-the-benefits-of-drinking-water-just-after-waking-up/

Natural Hydration Council. FAQs on Hydration. http://www.naturalhydrationcouncil.org.uk/hydration-facts/faqs-on-hydration/

Do You Know Your Resting Metabolic Rate (BMR)?

On any given day, most of us could provide a fairly accurate estimate of the balance we have in our bank account.  We keep track of our deposits and withdrawals to ensure we maintain a ‘healthy’ bank account.

How many of us know how many calories we burn each day (on average)?  Think of your daily calories as deposits and activity as withdrawals from your fitness bank account.  Knowing how many calories you burn at rest – can serve as the benchmark for how many calories you can consume and how active you need to be each day to maintain a healthy weight.  This calculation is called your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) or Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR).

Of course, there are several factors that can influence your BMR – height, current weight, gender, age, activity level, genetics, health issues, etc.  But to get some idea of where you are currently here’s one of many simple formulas to calculate your BMR:

Guys:
(Multiply your weight x  4.5)+(your height in inches x 16) – (multiply your age x 5) + 5

Here’s an example of a 175 lb., 6 ft. tall, 30-year-old male:
(175 lbs x 4.5 =  787.50)+(72 inches x 16 = 1152)-(30 x 5 = 150) – 5

787.50 + 1152 – 150 – 5 =  BMR – 1,784.5

Gals:
(Multiply your weight x  4.5)+(your height in inches x 16) – (multiply your age x 5) – 161

Here’s an example of a 125 lb., 5 ft. 5 in. tall, 30-year-old female:
(125 lbs x 4.5 =  562.5)+(65 inches x 16 = 1040)-(3 x 5 = 150) – 161

562.50 + 1040 – 150 – 161 =  BMR –  1,291.5

Or, if it’s easier, use this handy BMR calculator (Results will vary slightly)

Either way, it’s an important number for you to know so you can determine how many calories you can consume and how much activity you need to incorporate into your everyday.

If your goal is to lose weight (like many of us) you need to create a calorie deficit, which can be done by:

  • Eating fewer calories
  • Increasing your activity so you burn more calories
  • Or better yet, doing BOTH

It is estimated that a sedentary job such as sitting at a desk burns approximately 46 calories per hour.  If the average American works 1790 hours annually that’s 82,340 calories burned per year, a meager 225 calories per day.  That’s not enough.

Using the examples above:

  • Our 30-year-old male could consume approximately 2,010 calories and maintain his weight at 175.
  • Our 30-year-old female could consume approximately 1,517 calories and maintain her weight at 125.

Doesn’t sound like very many calories, does it?  Once you do your own calculations, you will know your approximate BMR and can estimate how many calories you can consume and how much activity you need to incorporate into your daily routine to maintain a healthy fitness bank account.

If you’re spot on…congratulations!  If you’ve got work to do but just can’t find the time, one way to increase your activity and calorie burn is to do it while you work  – using the OfficeGYM.

Resistance exercises using bands can burn as much as 200 – 300 calories per hour.   So, why not find out how many calories you have to work with by calculating your BMR. Then adjust your calorie intake accordingly and let OfficeGym help you,

“Make regular physical activity part of your everyday ”

Order OfficeGym Today!

Only $129.99 (plus s&h in US and Canada)

To your health!

SOURCES:
Mifflin-St Joer. Basal Metabolic Rate: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basal_metabolic_rate

Department of Health and Human Services. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005: http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/

Kastner, Jamie. How to use Resistance Bands and How Many Calories Do You Burn: http://www.livestrong.com/article/365713-how-to-use-resistance-bands-and-how-many-calories-do-you-burn/